Search Results

recipes

Coconut-Harissa Meatballs

In this hearty weeknight meal from recipe developer Sahara Henry Bohoskey, juicy pork meatballs get seared in a skillet, then simmered in a rich sauce of coconut milk and harissa. Henry Bohoskey’s preferred harissa is New York Shuk brand—it’s thick, punchy, and just spicy enough—but for bonus points go ahead and make your own. We like these saucy meatballs over mashed white beans, but they’re also good with polenta or orzo.

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
recipes

Cacio e Pepe Rösti

“When it comes to potatoes, more is more in my family. A few Thanksgivings ago, not one but two potato dishes appeared on our table—no one batted an eye, and it’s been that way ever since. Mashed potatoes always RSVP to the party, but this year I’m serving this little Cacio e Pepe Rösti alongside it. I like that you can cut it into elegant wedges—a small slice of civility on a plate otherwise occupied by blobs and scoops. Other pros: The potatoes can be boiled the night before, and all of the cooking takes place on the stovetop, meaning you’re not competing for coveted oven space.” —Christina Chaey, senior food editor

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Empty star icon
recipes

Chorizo and Calabrian Chile Stuffing

“I personally gravitate toward a holiday stuffing with a more classic flavor profile, but I’m also a firm believer that a little bit of spice improves most things. That’s why I incorporated meaty bits of spicy-tangy Mexican-style chorizo and a handful of fiery Calabrian chiles into this stuffing recipe. The heat these ingredients bring is fairly subtle, just enough to activate your taste buds in between bites of roast turkey and rich green bean casserole, and keeps you coming back for more.” —Rachel Gurjar, associate food editor

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
recipes

Dutch Oven No Mai Fan

No mai fan (also spelled lo mai fan) is a Cantonese dish of steamed glutinous rice studded with lap cheong (Chinese sausage), mushrooms, and other savory bits. For Chinese American recipe developer and fashion designer Peter Som, it was a childhood favorite that has since become a staple on his Thanksgiving table. In place of the traditional clay pot, or “sand pot,” Som’s version uses a Dutch oven, which is ideal for keeping the rice warm until you’re ready to serve it. If you can’t find glutinous rice, also known as sweet rice or sticky rice, use all jasmine rice and add a few extra tablespoons of broth for a slightly stickier consistency. After cooking, let the rice sit, covered, for 10–15 minutes. (Using only jasmine will be a fair approximation, but it’s well worth seeking out glutinous rice for this recipe.) And while any brand of Cantonese cured pork will do for its distinctive sweet and savory taste, Som prefers Kam Yen Jan’s sausages. For the rest of Som’s Thanksgiving menu, see his recipes for Asian Pear Salad With Peanut-Lime Dressing, Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Gochujang Brown Butter, Sweet Potato Tian, Char Siu Wellington, and Milk Tea Bread Pudding With Crème Anglaise.

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Empty star icon
Empty star icon
recipes

Twice-Roasted Squash With Vanilla, Maple, and Chile

The undisputed worst part of roasting squash is laboriously hacking apart a rock-hard gourd. Skip that entire process by roasting a kabocha squash whole, then tearing the cooked flesh into pieces to roast again under a fragrant and slightly spicy glaze. The result is tender squash with a sticky-sweet sheen in boats of crispy skin. If you want to work ahead, roast the whole squash a day before you need it and store it in your refrigerator; before serving, simply tear the squash, drizzle it with glaze, and pop it back into the oven for the final roast.

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
recipes

Dal Palak

Red lentils, or masoor dal, are a weeknight dinner superstar: They’re inexpensive, quick-cooking, and endlessly versatile. “I often cook a lot of masoor dal over the weekend to quickly flavor during the week for last-minute meals,” says cookbook author and Brooklyn Delhi founder Chitra Agrawal. “This dal palak packed with spinach is one of my go-to ways to use it.” If you’re strapped for time, Agrawal suggests throwing in baby spinach straight from the package rather than washing and chopping mature spinach leaves. For an extra savory note, add a big pinch of asafetida to the melted ghee when you add the seeds.

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Empty star icon
recipes

Radicchio, Bean, and Feta Salad

Bored with lackluster beans? Associate food editor Kendra Vaculin has a citrusy solution to your legume doom with a lemony dressing combining zest-infused oil and bright juice that pulls double duty as a marinade for canned beans and as a dressing for the salad itself. Marinate any white bean (like cannellini, navy, or Great Northern), then toss them with pleasantly bitter radicchio, thinly sliced raw brussels sprouts, and big chunks of salty feta.

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
recipes

Shrimp and Salami Pasta

A dreamy vacation to Portugal inspired this shrimp and salami pasta from recipe developer Shilpa Uskokovic. It’s pantry-friendly, takes under 45 minutes to prepare, and is packed with flavor thanks to supporting flavors like butter and wine. Use whichever salami fits your fancy—Uskokovic uses finocchiona, or fennel salami, for an extra kick. For glossy, saucy noodles, use a large pot to thoroughly toss everything together.

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
recipes

Sweet Potato Tian

The classic Provençal tian—a gratin of layered sliced vegetables served right from the vessel it’s baked in—gets a Chinese American twist, courtesy of recipe developer and fashion designer Peter Som. In this recipe, a favorite on his Thanksgiving table, Som uses thinly sliced rounds of sweet potato tossed in brown butter spiked with ginger, miso, dark soy sauce, and five-spice powder. “Made of fennel seeds, cinnamon, cloves, star anise, and Sichuan peppercorns, five-spice is infinitely versatile,” he says. “It brings warmth to whatever I’m making. I like to say it’s pumpkin spice’s bolder cousin.” Stacking the slices so they stand upright on their sides (rather than flat against the pan) exposes their edges to the heat of the oven, allowing them to become crispy and intensely flavorful. If you can’t find dark soy sauce, you can substitute 2 Tbsp. regular soy sauce plus ¼ tsp. granulated sugar. For the rest of Som’s Thanksgiving menu, see his recipes for Asian Pear Salad With Peanut-Lime Dressing, Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Gochujang Brown Butter, Dutch Oven No Mai Fan, Char Siu Wellington, and Milk Tea Bread Pudding With Crème Anglaise.

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Empty star icon
recipes

Apple-Rose Pie

This floral take on a classic apple pie from Back in the Day Bakery owner Cheryl Day may be new to many, but the use of rose water here is rooted in American history. “Before vanilla extract was widely available, the most popular flavoring in America was rose water,” Day writes in her newest cookbook, Cheryl Day’s Treasury of Southern Baking. “This recipe brings the lovely taste of rose water back to apple pie.” Plan to mix the filling at least 4 hours ahead so the accumulated juices can be reduced before you assemble and bake the pie. While the pie pictured has a layered top crust to create a floral effect, here we call for a simple rolled-out top crust with a few vents, which does the job nicely.

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Empty star icon
recipes

Cranberry and Golden Raisin Relish

In this no-fuss sauce, tart cranberries meet their match in bright ginger and fruity golden raisins. But this cranberry relish isn’t meant only for the Thanksgiving table: Try it as part of a festive breakfast on pancakes or French toast, as a holiday cheeseboard condiment, or as a sweet spread on grilled cheese sandwiches (it’s great with brie!).

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
recipes

Stuffing Biscuits

All the herby and aromatic flavors of a classic Thanksgiving stuffing—sage, rosemary, fennel seed, oniony scallion–are packed into this tender biscuit. Stacking pieces of dough before rolling out ensures plenty of tall, buttery layers. If you have any extra biscuits after The Big Meal, store them in an airtight container at room temperature overnight and prepare to have the most festive biscuits and gravy (featuring leftover Thanksgiving gravy, of course!) for breakfast the next morning.

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Empty star icon
recipes

Kale Salad With Pecan Vinaigrette

This dressing checks all the boxes: It’s nutty, salty, savory, and just sweet enough, with a hefty texture that holds its own against sturdy kale. Make it ahead of time and dress your salad before you put the finishing touches on your Thanksgiving meal; the salad should sit for a few minutes before serving to ensure the kale is tender. If you don’t have a food processor, you can chop your ingredients by hand—the finished dressing won’t be as creamy, but it will still taste great.

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
recipes

Garlic-Miso Butter Mashed Potatoes

“A couple of spoonfuls of miso adds a little extra umami and saltiness to these spuds, a subtle bridge between the roasted garlic and dairy that nobody will quite be able to put their finger on. And yes: These potatoes are actually mashed. I’m not going to stop you from pulling out a ricer or food mill if supersmooth is your thing, but I personally like a bit of texture—a few bits of intact potato remind you that you’re actually eating, you know, potatoes.” —Brad Leone, video host

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Empty star icon
recipes

Mini Baked Alaskas

The idea of making a baked Alaska may seem daunting, but these petite desserts from Cheryl Day’s Treasury of Southern Baking can be broken down into easy-to-make components that can all be made ahead of time. Feel free to use any flavor ice cream for the center. We prefer to use a kitchen torch to brown the meringue, but in a pinch you can brown the baked Alaskas under a broiler—just watch them very carefully and rotate often.

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Empty star icon
recipes

Bitter Greens With Cranberry Dressing

“If tart-sweet cranberry sauce is a Thanksgiving staple, why not use it to dress a bright, vibrant salad? In this recipe endives and frisée are topped with a chunky, tangy dressing made from canned whole-cranberry sauce—a bracing foil to earthy bitter greens. Sprinkled with crunchy candied pecans and salty shavings of Manchego cheese, this fresh and lively side is the dream complement to what can otherwise be a rather heavy spread.” —Jessie YuChen, assistant food editor

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
recipes

Chicken Mole Enchiladas

These luxurious enchiladas, served at the Original Mexican Cafe in Galveston, Texas, are a timeworn staple for senior staff writer Alex Beggs. “Mole can get too chocolatey if the cook is heavy-handed,” she says, “but here it’s in perfect balance with smoky ancho chiles.” Read Beggs’ essay about what these enchiladas mean to her, then try your hand at making them yourself. The Original’s streamlined approach to making mole cuts down on ingredients without sacrificing flavor for a rich, velvety sauce that’s layered under crispy-gooey cheese.

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Empty star icon
recipes

Pineapple Upside-Down Cake

“Upside-down cakes are such a joy to bake,” writes Cheryl Day in her newest book, Cheryl Day’s Treasury of Southern Baking. “It’s the surprise when you unmold the cake that makes them so satisfying.” For an instant upgrade to this retro classic, ditch the typical fire engine red maraschinos for sophisticated, fruity Luxardo cherries. Flip the cake while it’s still warm—but not hot!—for easy removal.

Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Filled star icon
Empty star icon

11 remaining results